Barefoot Sewing

Tutorial: How to make a cosplay fan!

chann-bee:

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Hey everyone!  Another tutorial for this blog.  I couldn’t find any tutorials on how to make a fan completely from scratch for my Suki cosplay; they all required you to start with the main folding wood base thing (as in taking apart an existing paper fan and using that).  That seemed like more trouble than it’s worth ESPECIALLY for this type of fan which is separate pieces of “metal” rather than one large folded piece of paper…so I made this tutorial for anyone in the place I was in.  You know how to make swords, staffs, and shields…now you can make a fan.  

The fan is fully functional meaning it’s super easy to carry and store.  It’s 12 pieces held together by a small dowel rod and buttoncraft thread.  I made this using my own measurements, but just shrink or extend the lengths of the pieces to alter the size of the total “semi circle”.

LET’S GO

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*I want to note:  my paper pieces weren’t single sheets.  I got gold-colored posterboard but it wasn’t as thick as I’d wanted.  I wanted this thing to be hefty and durable.  So my fan pieces are actually drawing paper (not printing paper) sandwiched between two gold posterboard pieces of all identical shapes.

*craft rope:  this is just the stuff that kids get to make bracelets and crap from.  Anything bulky like it will work.  Heck even the buttoncraft will work if you wanna waste that much of it.

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Please ask if you have any questions.  I would like to help and see your fans.  Also please credit me when appropriate :L  I’m sorry I didn’t have any in-progress photos you know how it is rushing to get stuff done in a night lol.  Thank you for reading ٩꒰。•‿•。꒱۶



(via youcancosplay21)

How To Make A Wig Head That Has Your Hairline and Head Shape, with a wighead and less than $10 of materials!

silencedrowns:

The immediate benefits of having one of these might not be so obvious, but once I made one a while back, I haven’t considered styling a wig on a head that ISN’T of this type! It allows you to do everything but measuring bang length on a head the same as yours. Want to spike a wig and make sure your hairline won’t show? You can do that. Need to alter a wig to have a weird hairline and you don’t want to keep trying the wig on and off again? You can do that. Want to pull a wig in a ponytail but not make it too small? Yep, you can do that! Want to do a really crazy wig for someone who isn’t nearby? Get them to make one of these and mail it to you, and you can style it just as well as if they were wearing it! It’s a nearly indispensable tool in my wig-styling arsenal.

This tutorial is starring tumblr user notyourwaifu as my wonderful model! (She’s currently notyourwaiphantom for Halloween.) Similarly, if someone reblogged this during October and the URL for the jump doesn’t work, I’m only reospookywagon for October; switch the URL to “silencedrowns” and you should be fine.

That said, let’s go!

Read More

(via ardawigs)

gr8cosplaytips:

Having trouble telling if a fabric black or dark navy blue? Light it on fire!

Will this help you decide? Probably not but it’ll relieve your stress about your inability to see colors.

cosplay-gamers:

Hylian Shield Tutorial by Termina Cosplay [FB] [DA]
Materials
insulation foam (2 inches thick)
craft knife/carving knife
sandpaper
paper
pencils
worbla
heat gun
apoxie sculpt
scissors
clay tools
water
wood glue
paint
paint brushes
leather straps
screws and washers
screw driver
dry wall anchors
drill
possibly a nail and hammer (for poking holes in your leather)
Steps
First, you’ll need to draw out your full sized pattern.  I like to use multiple references when making patterns.  I used a shield that we bought for a Dark Link cosplay and the concept art for the shield in Twilight Princess from the Hyrule Historia. The Dark Link shield was used for size and the concept art was used for the details.  To make your pattern perfectly symmetrical, draw only one side by hand, and then fold over down the middle and transfer what you drew over to the other side.  
Next, take your insulation foam and use your pattern to draw the shape of the shield onto it.  Then, take your carving knife (I use an adjustable exacto craft knife) and cut the shape out.
At this point, you will need to carve the round edges onto your shield. You can draw guidelines on your foam if you would like to, but I just kind of eyeballed mine.  Just take your knife and cut off small amounts of the edges until you have your curve the way you like it. As you can see, my shield has curved edges but the center is still mostly flat.  Thats how I wanted my shield to be, but if you want your entire shield to be curved, you will either need thicker foam, or you’ll need to double up another layer of foam on top of your first.  One layer of 2 inch foam just isn’t enough to cut a curve through the whole thing and still look nice.  Once you have your curve cut, you can sand it down smooth, though this isn’t necessary because your curve will likely be covered up later anyway.
The next step is to cover your foam in worbla.  This will add durability and give it a nice surface.  Cut out enough to cover the back of your shield and another piece to cover the front.  Cut a little more than you think you’ll need to avoid any mistakes and make sure you have enough on the top layer to account for the curves.  Now set your shield face up on the bottom layer of worbla and heat the top layer of worbla over the foam.  The worbla will stretch a little, but be extra careful not to let it stretch too much, because it could easily rip in the process.  Press the worbla down on the foam to seal it and work slow to make sure the curve doesn’t end up with creases all over it.  try to keep it nice and smooth, but if you end up with some seams and creases along the edge, it isn’t that big of a deal.  As long as the center is smooth you’ll be ok.
Once its cooled off a little bit, flip it over and heat up the back side and press the worbla down to seal it.  Also go over the seems between the two piece at this point to make sure its sealed all the way around.
Next, cut off the excess along the edges, but make sure you leave about a centimeter of space around it.
Use that centimeter of extra worbla you left along the edges to seal the seams even more.  Heat the edge up, and press the excess up onto the side.  Make sure you press it up on the side rather than down on the back.  You want to keep the back nice and smooth.
Now, you’ll go back to your pattern and cut all the details out of it.  If you want to you can leave one side uncut, like I have in my picture, But I think its easier in the long run to just cut all the pieces out. 
Next, tape the center of the shield pattern onto the shield, like it shows in the picture.
Use the pattern as a stencil to draw out all the details onto the worbla.  Make sure you get the outside edge as well, and not just the center details.  If you only cut half of your pattern details out, like I did, you’ll have to flip your pattern over to get the details on both sides, but if you cut everything out you won’t have to do this, which is why I recommend just cutting everything out in the beginning.  
Some details might actually be easier to free hand.  I did this with the swirly details on the top and with the bolts around the triforce and the corners.  
Once you have all your details drawn on your shield, its time to add the apoxie sculpt.  Move your shield to a workplace that can get messy.
Apoxie sculpt is a two part epoxy clay.  All you have to do is mix equal parts of A and B to use it.  I was able to do my Hylian Shield and my Master Sword with a 4 pound kit.  It is a little expensive, but the quality is worth it in my opinion.  The clay doesn’t shrink or crack at all and is very strong and solid when completely hardened, so you’ll have a hard time damaging it. It is also very easy to work with and can be smoothed out nicely with a little bit of water.  
To mix, just grab equal parts of A and B.
Roll them into logs
Twist the logs together
And knead them together until you can no longer see any streaks.  If you don’t mix it well enough, it won’t harden properly.
The first thing you’ll add with the apoxie sculpt is the outside edge.  Follow your lines around the outside edge and cover it with a thin layer of apoxie sculpt.  Get it as close the the same thickness all the way around as you can. Use your clay tools to get a nice sharp edge, and smooth it out with some water. Add the sharp edges around the corners here too.
Optional: While your clay is still soft, go in with your heat gun and a clay tool to add some gashes and battle scars to the center of your shield.  You could also do this before you start adding the apoxie sculpt, but the order here doesn’t matter
Optional: You can also add some gashes to the sides where the apoxie sculpt is.  You can even make the slash go from the apoxie sculpt up into the worbla if you want!  Its up to you :D
Next, you’ll add in the details on the center.  Just fill in the lines with apoxie sculpt…
and shape it into place with your tools! make sure to dip your tools in water to keep it from sticking.
Do this with all the details on the center.  Some places might be easier to just use your hands rather than the clay tools.  Also use your fingers to smooth the surface out with some water.  Make sure that if you have slashes in your shield, to also put the slashes through the apoxie sculpt before it hardens.  
Once you have all your main details on, let that harden for a few hours before putting the finer details on the top.  letting it harden first just makes it easier not to mess anything up when you put more on top of it.  Here, add your swirly details and the bolts around the triforce and the corners
Here is what your shield should look like after all these steps.  Let it harden for at least 24 hours before proceeding.
After 24 hours, prime it and add your paint!  How you paint it is up to you, but I mixed metallic pigments into my paint to give it an extra shine.  For details on how I paint my props and armor, check out my painting tutorial here!  If you want details on how to use metallic pigments, click here!  
At the very last step I added a couple of leather straps (from an old leather belt) to the back for holding.  This isn’t exactly what the back of the shield looks like in the game, but it works quite well.  I marked where I wanted the straps to go on the back, drilled a hole through the worbla where I wanted the screws to go, then I pounded some dry wall anchors into the holes for extra support.  I then poked some holes through the leather straps where the screws would go through with a nail and hammer, and then screwed the straps into the dry wall anchors. You can find dry wall anchors at any hardware store.  If you want to make sure your leather doesn’t rip away from the screws, use washers with the screws.
(Used with permission, full credits to Termina Cosplay)

cosplay-gamers:

Hylian Shield Tutorial by Termina Cosplay [FB] [DA]

Materials

  • insulation foam (2 inches thick)
  • craft knife/carving knife
  • sandpaper
  • paper
  • pencils
  • worbla
  • heat gun
  • apoxie sculpt
  • scissors
  • clay tools
  • water
  • wood glue
  • paint
  • paint brushes
  • leather straps
  • screws and washers
  • screw driver
  • dry wall anchors
  • drill
  • possibly a nail and hammer (for poking holes in your leather)

Steps

First, you’ll need to draw out your full sized pattern.  I like to use multiple references when making patterns.  I used a shield that we bought for a Dark Link cosplay and the concept art for the shield in Twilight Princess from the Hyrule Historia. The Dark Link shield was used for size and the concept art was used for the details.  To make your pattern perfectly symmetrical, draw only one side by hand, and then fold over down the middle and transfer what you drew over to the other side.  

Next, take your insulation foam and use your pattern to draw the shape of the shield onto it.  Then, take your carving knife (I use an adjustable exacto craft knife) and cut the shape out.

At this point, you will need to carve the round edges onto your shield. You can draw guidelines on your foam if you would like to, but I just kind of eyeballed mine.  Just take your knife and cut off small amounts of the edges until you have your curve the way you like it. As you can see, my shield has curved edges but the center is still mostly flat.  Thats how I wanted my shield to be, but if you want your entire shield to be curved, you will either need thicker foam, or you’ll need to double up another layer of foam on top of your first.  One layer of 2 inch foam just isn’t enough to cut a curve through the whole thing and still look nice.  Once you have your curve cut, you can sand it down smooth, though this isn’t necessary because your curve will likely be covered up later anyway.

The next step is to cover your foam in worbla.  This will add durability and give it a nice surface.  Cut out enough to cover the back of your shield and another piece to cover the front.  Cut a little more than you think you’ll need to avoid any mistakes and make sure you have enough on the top layer to account for the curves.  Now set your shield face up on the bottom layer of worbla and heat the top layer of worbla over the foam.  The worbla will stretch a little, but be extra careful not to let it stretch too much, because it could easily rip in the process.  Press the worbla down on the foam to seal it and work slow to make sure the curve doesn’t end up with creases all over it.  try to keep it nice and smooth, but if you end up with some seams and creases along the edge, it isn’t that big of a deal.  As long as the center is smooth you’ll be ok.

Once its cooled off a little bit, flip it over and heat up the back side and press the worbla down to seal it.  Also go over the seems between the two piece at this point to make sure its sealed all the way around.

Next, cut off the excess along the edges, but make sure you leave about a centimeter of space around it.

Use that centimeter of extra worbla you left along the edges to seal the seams even more.  Heat the edge up, and press the excess up onto the side.  Make sure you press it up on the side rather than down on the back.  You want to keep the back nice and smooth.

Now, you’ll go back to your pattern and cut all the details out of it.  If you want to you can leave one side uncut, like I have in my picture, But I think its easier in the long run to just cut all the pieces out. 

Next, tape the center of the shield pattern onto the shield, like it shows in the picture.

Use the pattern as a stencil to draw out all the details onto the worbla.  Make sure you get the outside edge as well, and not just the center details.  If you only cut half of your pattern details out, like I did, you’ll have to flip your pattern over to get the details on both sides, but if you cut everything out you won’t have to do this, which is why I recommend just cutting everything out in the beginning.  

Some details might actually be easier to free hand.  I did this with the swirly details on the top and with the bolts around the triforce and the corners.  

Once you have all your details drawn on your shield, its time to add the apoxie sculpt.  Move your shield to a workplace that can get messy.

Apoxie sculpt is a two part epoxy clay.  All you have to do is mix equal parts of A and B to use it.  I was able to do my Hylian Shield and my Master Sword with a 4 pound kit.  It is a little expensive, but the quality is worth it in my opinion.  The clay doesn’t shrink or crack at all and is very strong and solid when completely hardened, so you’ll have a hard time damaging it. It is also very easy to work with and can be smoothed out nicely with a little bit of water.  

To mix, just grab equal parts of A and B.

Roll them into logs

Twist the logs together

And knead them together until you can no longer see any streaks.  If you don’t mix it well enough, it won’t harden properly.

The first thing you’ll add with the apoxie sculpt is the outside edge.  Follow your lines around the outside edge and cover it with a thin layer of apoxie sculpt.  Get it as close the the same thickness all the way around as you can. Use your clay tools to get a nice sharp edge, and smooth it out with some water. Add the sharp edges around the corners here too.

Optional: While your clay is still soft, go in with your heat gun and a clay tool to add some gashes and battle scars to the center of your shield.  You could also do this before you start adding the apoxie sculpt, but the order here doesn’t matter

Optional: You can also add some gashes to the sides where the apoxie sculpt is.  You can even make the slash go from the apoxie sculpt up into the worbla if you want!  Its up to you :D

Next, you’ll add in the details on the center.  Just fill in the lines with apoxie sculpt…

and shape it into place with your tools! make sure to dip your tools in water to keep it from sticking.

Do this with all the details on the center.  Some places might be easier to just use your hands rather than the clay tools.  Also use your fingers to smooth the surface out with some water.  Make sure that if you have slashes in your shield, to also put the slashes through the apoxie sculpt before it hardens.  

Once you have all your main details on, let that harden for a few hours before putting the finer details on the top.  letting it harden first just makes it easier not to mess anything up when you put more on top of it.  Here, add your swirly details and the bolts around the triforce and the corners

Here is what your shield should look like after all these steps.  Let it harden for at least 24 hours before proceeding.

After 24 hours, prime it and add your paint!  How you paint it is up to you, but I mixed metallic pigments into my paint to give it an extra shine.  For details on how I paint my props and armor, check out my painting tutorial here!  If you want details on how to use metallic pigments, click here!  

At the very last step I added a couple of leather straps (from an old leather belt) to the back for holding.  This isn’t exactly what the back of the shield looks like in the game, but it works quite well.  I marked where I wanted the straps to go on the back, drilled a hole through the worbla where I wanted the screws to go, then I pounded some dry wall anchors into the holes for extra support.  I then poked some holes through the leather straps where the screws would go through with a nail and hammer, and then screwed the straps into the dry wall anchors. You can find dry wall anchors at any hardware store.  If you want to make sure your leather doesn’t rip away from the screws, use washers with the screws.

(Used with permission, full credits to Termina Cosplay)

(via youcancosplay21)

deadpoolvariant:

Hey flightlesslad. For the eyes I basically drew them on paper and traced them out. Then I cut them out with the help of some blue painters tape. I used stretch fabric glue to glue some white material from an Eddie Bauer sunshade for the white part.

It took tons of trial and error to tweak the shape and also sew/re-sew the position to get them to where I was happy. I don’t think I want to do this again lol. At least I added +1 to sewing skill and a button missing from a shirt would be a piece of cake now.

(via learning-to-sew)

Survey corps cape tutorial part 1

coralpeachy:

Or how I made a cape and now never want to wear anything but.
Or simply a simple circle cape tutorial.

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You can of course buy the survey corps cape online, there are dozens for sale for reasonable and unreasonable prices if you look around, but I wanted to make my own so here we go! Disclaimer: my drawings are not scale accurate. Cause son, aint no body got time for that.

Begin with 2 meters of fabric in the colour of your choice.
Fold your fabric in half and mark with pins or chalk the measurements to cut out the circle.
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My fabric was 60” wide so I was able to cut out a full circle. If your fabric is not that wide, no worries! Simply cut out two half circles and sew one side together.

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If you have a full circle, cut a straight line from the neck hole to the hem. This makes dramatic cape twirling possible.

Next, cut out your hood pattern. I cut 2 with my fabric and 2 with lining to get a nice finished interior to my hood. For the hood lining you need about 0.75 meters.

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Sew your hood together, good side to good side with a 5/8” seam allowance.
At this point you should try your hood on, make sure you like it, or if you’re wearing a wig/your hair like Hangi’s for example, make sure it fits over your ponytail. Once you’re sure you like it, clip the corners of your hood for a nice clean curve.
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Do the same for your lining and iron the seams open for both. This will make it easier when you sew the two hoods together good side to good side along the opening of the hood. Which you are ready to do now!
Next we attach the hood to cape. Begin by pining the center back of the hood to the center of the neck on the cape and work your way out from there.

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Try and follow the curve of the neck as much as possible. Don’t worry if the hood isn’t long enough to match the neck hole, we’ll fix that all in a moment.
Go ahead and sew the hood to the cape keeping a 5/8th seam, be vigilant and go slow make sure your cape isn’t getting bunched up under your hood.
Once it’s sewn together, try it on! Make sure it looks fantastic.

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Ahhhh yess, you’re feeling like killing some titans right about now, aren’t you?
So you like it, clip the curve like we did with the hood, taking care not to cut your stitches.
You can at this point either take 1/2 ” bias tape that matches the colour of your cape, or cut a strip of matching fabric like I did to encompass the joint of hood and cape. If your hood wasn’t long enough the match the neck hole exactly, this is when we cover that up!

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Bam! Look how fresh and clean that looks.
Take a deep breath cause we’re almost done.
It’s time to hem this mother flipper.

I did a 1/2” hem all along the bottom and down the two fronts of the cape with my sewing machine.
Sew on a button, or fastening of your choice, slap the patch on center back and you’re done!! Good job and titans beware.


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Now that we’ve reached the end of this, are you wondering why this is called part 1? Isn’t the cape finished? Why yes, yes it is.
But Coral likes to torture herself, and has decided that the patch is too stiff for twirling in this cape and wants to create her own “supple” wings of freedom…
Stay tuned for that.
And thanks for following along! : )

(via youcancosplay21)

laki-watersnake:

How to make a Labrys Axe (from Persona 4 Arena)

Somebody asked how I made my axe recently, and I thought I would share how I made mine with everyone through the use of a picture guide!

Hope it’ll be useful to fellow crafters out there! (I still consider myself an amateur though, and coupled with the fact I didn’t do any research on how it could be done beforehand, there’s probably lots more to improve on how I made this.)

Complete list of materials used: Foam board, Styrofoam, Gum paper, EVA foam, PVC pipes, screws, industrial cable, wood glue, hot glue gun, spray paint, silicone sealant

Cosplay photos at the end are taken by: Brian Lim Photography (http://www.facebook.com/BrianLimPhotography) and Razrig Photography (http://www.facebook.com/razrigphotography) Thank you for the amazing photos!

(via youcancosplay21)

cosplayinamerica:


COSPLAY BRINGS THE WORLD TOGETHER!I always get a little nervous when I go Cosplaying around the city and there isn’t a convention going on anywhere. You never know how people are going to react. Some people can be really cruel or the police just target you for being a “Weirdo.” Needless to say, I’m always on guard. However, this precious moment happen while we were at the Capitol. While we were setting up the Photo Shoot, these little girls came timidly walking up to us. The eldest said that the little girl in pink wanted to say hi. The little girl in pink was so shy that she couldn’t get a word out but just a shy smile. The eldest, who spoke for the whole group, said that all the girls had never met a Female Superhero. They were all so excited! I didn’t have the heart to explain that I wasn’t technically a girl but a genderbend of Bucky but all the girls were so excited to shake my hand, hug me, and just talk to me that I decided it wasn’t even worth the mention.The younger ones kept jumping up and down and saying “You’re so cool!” - “You’re like Super Woman!” ~ “Girl Power!” They just filled up my heart with joy. They all had to leave after a few minutes but gave me a huge hug and said I made their trip amazing. Moments like this is why I believe Cosplay is so awesome! It isn’t about how many LIKES you have or how “Cosfamous” you are. It’s about doing what you love and, in the process, spreading as much love and joy to others that you feel yourself! 

( from Studio Eingana / source : http://ow.ly/zMkPB  )

cosplayinamerica:

COSPLAY BRINGS THE WORLD TOGETHER!

I always get a little nervous when I go Cosplaying around the city and there isn’t a convention going on anywhere. You never know how people are going to react. Some people can be really cruel or the police just target you for being a “Weirdo.” Needless to say, I’m always on guard. 

However, this precious moment happen while we were at the Capitol. 

While we were setting up the Photo Shoot, these little girls came timidly walking up to us. The eldest said that the little girl in pink wanted to say hi. The little girl in pink was so shy that she couldn’t get a word out but just a shy smile. 

The eldest, who spoke for the whole group, said that all the girls had never met a Female Superhero. They were all so excited! 

I didn’t have the heart to explain that I wasn’t technically a girl but a genderbend of Bucky but all the girls were so excited to shake my hand, hug me, and just talk to me that I decided it wasn’t even worth the mention.

The younger ones kept jumping up and down and saying “You’re so cool!” - “You’re like Super Woman!” ~ “Girl Power!” They just filled up my heart with joy. 

They all had to leave after a few minutes but gave me a huge hug and said I made their trip amazing. 

Moments like this is why I believe Cosplay is so awesome! It isn’t about how many LIKES you have or how “Cosfamous” you are. It’s about doing what you love and, in the process, spreading as much love and joy to others that you feel yourself! 

( from Studio Eingana / source : http://ow.ly/zMkPB  )

(via youcancosplay21)