Barefoot Sewing

1: Matt blows some compressed air into the outer shell when it resists coming off the mold. Works like a charm.

2: Fiberglass shell completely off.

3-4: Rubber mold comes off.

5: Rubber mold inside out, so I could trim some of the lines and clean off leftover bits of clay.

6: Put the fiberglass shell back on and now it’s ready to cast. 90% of that duct tape is completely unnecessary, but I don’t want to stab myself on fiberglass (again) and it’s a bit of extra stability.

gr8cosplaytips:

If you replace your entire wardrobe with cosplays, all you’ll have for cons is closet cosplay. Suck on that, haters.

cowbuttcrunchies:

Hi! I love the detail embroidery adds to your cosplays, and I would love to involve it in my own but I don’t know where to start. Could you perhaps give me a few pointers?

You have a few different options available if you’re looking to add some embroidery to your cosplays:

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  • Hand embroidery: Done by hand via a needle, embroidery floss, and a hoop to keep your fabric taut.  This is an easy and cheap way to embellish your cosplays, but it is very time-consuming.  The spindle on Hhhhammy’s Aurora gown are four inches high and took several weeks to complete.
  • Machine embroidery (custom designed) - A custom embroidery pattern that can be downloaded into your embroidery machine.  This gives you as much freedom as hand embroidery, but is less time-consuming.  However, designing your pattern can take much trial and error, in order to get the stitching correct.  Also be careful about making your design too small or placing too many stitches in a tiny area unless you know your machine can handle it.  Custom embroidery designs can also be purchased or  commissioned from online sellers, since certain embroidery file types are universal.
  • Machine embroidery (pre-programmed):  These embroidery designs or stitches come preset on your embroidery or sewing machine.  This is the fastest method, but you have a limited number of options available if you’re looking for something specific.  Also be aware that any elaborate stitch designs on a regular sewing machine will come with a maximum width - unless you have a high-end machine it is usually not possible to make your stitches wider than the length of your foot.

Basically, first consider what kind of equipment you have available.  Don’t have an embroidery machine on hand?  You’ll want to either hand embroider or check your sewing machine to see if it comes with any fancy stitches.  Second, think about how large your design needs to be and how much time you have available.  For hand embroidery, make sure that you start early on so that you can work a little bit over a long period of time.  Even machine embroidery can take longer than you think, since you will need to hoop and re-hoop many times if you are embroidering a large space - my Signless cape needed to be re-hooped over 30 times to embroider the front trim.

Machine embroidery on costumes is crazy awesome if you have the right software to get it done. Sadly the cheapest software I know of to design your own, regardless of whether you have an embroidery machine, is $450 (Embird).

For the record, I am happy to make custom embroidery designs for personal use or to embroider straight onto costume pieces, like I did for these Dangan Ronpa cosplay sleeves.

(via learning-to-sew)

The silicone rubber mold for my flash suit helmet is complete. Now we’re making the fiberglass mother mold, which will keep the silicone from bending or stretching while we cast the helmet in resin. Since we have to be able to remove the outer shell to remove the finished helmet cast, we made it in two slightly overlapping parts.

I had several requests for this one, so once a good picture of the emblem surfaced I just had to make a Star-Lord arm patch.

I had several requests for this one, so once a good picture of the emblem surfaced I just had to make a Star-Lord arm patch.

PSA: About Cosplayers and Videographers at Conventions

projectcosplay:

A lot of people, both cosplayers and not, will get approached by people taking video at conventions, and they usually will ask your permission before videoing you. This is great! Bigger productions will ask you to sign release forms. This is pretty standard legal protection stuff.

However, it’s a good idea before agreeing to be recorded to ask what they will be asking you to do. It’s better if you can ask them to video you first and then give agreement or not based on what is actually recorded. If someone is shifty about what they want to video you doing, you don’t have to agree to be recorded. If they video you and do something you’re uncomfortable with, state clearly that they do not have permission to use your image (into the camera if possible so that it is on record).

Because model releases are somewhat legally binding, wait until after a photo or video is taken to sign the release. This means you can decide to sign the release or not based on what they actually do.

Sometimes larger or formal shoots will require release forms in advance. Make individual judgement calls on whether or not to sign these by looking into the party you are signing the release to.

If someone is using their status as press or photographer to harass or otherwise be jerks at the convention, get their name, badge name, description, or snap a cell phone photo and report them to convention staff. No one wants these people at con, and staff may very well revoke their badges to prevent them harassing attendees.

Coats 1 and 2 of my silicone helmet mold are applied and curing, it will need about 2 more coats to be thick enough to use. It’s a sticky goopy mess right now, but hopefully it will work out in the end!

cosplaytutorial:

Tip Tuesday #78

Having trouble using your phone touch pad through gloves or a bodysuit? Use conductive thread! A couple stitches that touch your finger (when worn) will allow you to use your touch electronics. 


It’s taken almost a month for me to finish the clay base for my flash suit helmet mold, but it’s finally ready to go! If I recall correctly, it took about 10 hours of sculpting time.

It’s not screen accurate - heck, it’s not even symmetrical - but I love it, and that’s all that matters.

For tomorrow’s adventure, I’ll start to apply Rebound 25 rubber to the base to make the mold. Eventually, I’ll cast the helmet in resin.

It’s taken almost a month for me to finish the clay base for my flash suit helmet mold, but it’s finally ready to go! If I recall correctly, it took about 10 hours of sculpting time.

It’s not screen accurate - heck, it’s not even symmetrical - but I love it, and that’s all that matters.

For tomorrow’s adventure, I’ll start to apply Rebound 25 rubber to the base to make the mold. Eventually, I’ll cast the helmet in resin.

cosplaypositivity:


I’m working on cosplaying Sansa (from Game of Thrones) in this dress, but the sleeves have me totally stumped. Any advice would be helpful, I don’t want to have to buy a new pattern ^.^

I would say use a sleeve pattern you already have then draft another piece to have the flowy bit. It’s best to draft the pattern with scrap fabric but sometimes I use paper. Hope this helps
~Sola
Adding to what Sola said, you can easily just adapt the pattern for the sleeves. They’re big and floaty so you have a good margin for error. I’m no sewing master, or even novice, but I’ve drawn you a beautiful couple of diagrams that may possibly help with patterning.
Personally, I’d roll with the one on the right. When drawing the sleeve, stop at the elbow and flare out as if you were patterning a cone (you can make a big cone with paper around your arm if it helps!) then elongate the middle section as long as you like to create a flute sleeve. :)~Pipa

cosplaypositivity:

I’m working on cosplaying Sansa (from Game of Thrones) in this dress, but the sleeves have me totally stumped. Any advice would be helpful, I don’t want to have to buy a new pattern ^.^

I would say use a sleeve pattern you already have then draft another piece to have the flowy bit. It’s best to draft the pattern with scrap fabric but sometimes I use paper. Hope this helps

~Sola

Adding to what Sola said, you can easily just adapt the pattern for the sleeves. They’re big and floaty so you have a good margin for error.
I’m no sewing master, or even novice, but I’ve drawn you a beautiful couple of diagrams that may possibly help with patterning.

Personally, I’d roll with the one on the right. When drawing the sleeve, stop at the elbow and flare out as if you were patterning a cone (you can make a big cone with paper around your arm if it helps!) then elongate the middle section as long as you like to create a flute sleeve. :)

~Pipa